Disclaimer: The lifting techniques contained within this document will reduce your chance of sustaining an injury if done properly. SportsCare issues no statement claiming these lifting techniques will 100% prevent injury. If you experience any pain or discomfort while lifting an object, please report to your Physical Therapist. Please contact SportsCare if you have any questions or concerns.

Basic Lift

 

Basic Lift (Diagonal Lift): This lift is the most common method of good lifting technique. Use the basic lift for objects small enough to straddle where you have enough room to use a wide stance.

  1. Get close to the object.
  2. Stand with a wide stance: put one foot forward and to the side of the object.
  3. Keep your back straight, push you buttocks out, and use your legs and hips to lower yourself to the object.
  4. Move the load as close to you as possible
  5. If the box has handles, grasp the handles firmly and go to step 9.
  6. Put the hand (that is on the same side of your body as the forward foot) on the side of the object furthest from you. Put the other hand on the side of the object closest to you. Your hands should be on opposite corners of the object.
  7. Grasp the object firmly with both hands and prepare for the lift: look forward and tighten abdominals.
  8. Lift upwards following your head and shoulders. Hold the load close to your body. Lift by extending your legs with your back straight, your buttocks out, and breathe out as you lift.

power lift

 

Power Lift: Use the power lift for objects too large for you to straddle. This lift is very similar to the basic lift. In the power lift, the object shifts your center of gravity forward, and you must push your buttocks out to compensate.

  1. Put one foot in front of the other using a wide stance.
  2. Keep your back straight, push your buttocks out and use your legs and hips to lower yourself down to the object.
  3. Move the load as close to you as possible,
  4. Grasp the object firmly with both hands.
  5. Prepare for the lift: look forward and tighten abdominals.
  6. Lift upwards following your head and shoulders. Hold the load close to your body. Lift by extending your legs with your back straight, your buttocks out (exaggerate this position), and breathe out as you lift.

 

Tripod Lift: Use the tripod lift for objects with uneven weight distribution (example: sacks of food). Recommended for people with decreased arm strength. Not recommended for people with bad knees.

  1. Put one foot next to the object. Keep your back straight, push your buttocks out and slowly lower yourself down onto one knee. (For support as you lower yourself down, put one hand on a stool or on your thigh for support).
  2. Position the object close to the knee on the ground.
  3. Grasp the object firmly with both hands.
  4. Slide the object from the knee on the ground to mid-thigh. Keep your head forward, your back straight, and your buttocks out, and lift the object onto the opposite thigh.
  5. Put both of your forearms under the object (with your palms facing upward) and hug the object to your stomach and chest.
  6. Prepare for the lift: look forward and tighten abdominals.
  7. Lift upwards following your head and shoulders. Hold the load close to your body. Lift by extending your legs with your back straight, your buttocks out, and breathe out as you lift.

Tripod Lift

Lift Safe, Lift Smart! 

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